videos

PANEL 1: Traces of the Future: Reversing the time of archival research.

Through a kaleidoscope of theoretical, technological and artistic perspectives, the papers in this panel investigate the archival trace as a fragment of an event yet-to-come, rather than as a sign of an already occurred past. By means of this reversed temporal logic, the futuristic potential embedded in the archives will be disclosed and discussed. This panel included presentations by Sam McAuliffe, Susan Schuppli and Fernanda Albertoni. Below is a youtube playlist featuring all presentations: use the drop-down menu or arrows to navigate. Scroll down for panel 2 and 3 as well as the closing performance.

 

PANEL 2: Surviving Archives: How to save a collection endangered by war, catastrophe and exilic movements.

The preservation and future existence of archival collections is threatened by armed conflicts (both actual and potential), natural or man-made catastrophes and diasporic movements. The papers in this panel form a variegated survey of survival strategies for endangered archives: from institutional pre-emptive tactics, to deterritorializing practices inspired by Deleuzian concepts of ‘minor literature’, to the construction of exilic itinerant archives. Below is a youtube playlist featuring all presentations: use the drop-down menu or arrows to navigate. Scroll down for panel 3 and the closing performance.

 

PANEL 3: Latency and Hauntology: How the Past Haunts the Future and the Future Haunts the Past.

This panel considers latent archives encapsulated within natural landscapes or man-built environments. The papers in the panel reveal different dormant signs as encoded in the material surroundings: from the haunting aspects of the nuclear past, to practices of territorial expropriation in present-day Palestine, to the indeterminate texture of a future caught between utopia and risk in contemporary Lebanon. Below is a youtube playlist featuring all presentations: use the drop-down menu or arrows to navigate. Scroll down for the closing performance.

 

Zoë Mendelson, Which Shelf for the Broken One? What the hoard can teach us about acts of gathering.